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33 notes

Y así, amor, en vano intenta
tu esfuerzo loco ofenderme:
pues podré decir, al verme
expirar sin entregarme,
que conseguiste matarme
mas no pudiste vencerme.
Fragmento de Dime vencedor rapaz, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (via poesianoerestu)

40 notes

pues ya en líquido humor viste y tocaste
mi corazón deshecho entre tus manos.
Fragmento de Esta tarde, mi bien, cuando te hablaba, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (via poesianoerestu)

68 notes

espiralito:

¿En qué te ofendo, cuando sólo intento poner bellezas en mi entendimiento y no mi entendimiento en las bellezas? - Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz

espiralito:

¿En qué te ofendo, cuando sólo intento poner bellezas en mi entendimiento y no mi entendimiento en las bellezas? - Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz

253 notes

Yo no puedo tenerte ni dejarte
ni sé por qué al dejarte o al tenerte
se encuentra un no sé qué para quererte
y mucho si sé qué para olvidarte.
Fragmento de Que da miedo amar sin mucha pena, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (via poesianoerestu)

437 notes

dragonsupremacy:

Portrait of Juana at age fifteen, painted in 1666.
Juana Inés de la Cruz (1651-1695) was the daughter of a Spanish Peninsular captain and a Creole woman. She was born in San Miguel Nepantla, Mexico on 2 December, 1651. For a woman of her time, Juana was well educated—and almost entirely self-taught, at that. She could read by age three, she mastered Latin, and she even learned Nahuatl, the Aztec language. She read many books and collected them for her library, and she wrote music and poems and became known throughout Mexico and Europe for her poetry. Juana asked for permission to dress as a man and enter the University of Mexico, but she was denied.
At age seventeen, the Viceroy Antonio Sebastián Álvarez de Toledo, the Marquis de Mancera, arranged for a jury of theologians, philosophers, and university professors to question Juana about a variety of scientific and literary subjects in order to test her knowledge. Juana answered their questions so brilliantly that she not only stumped these educated men, she also gained a reputation for her intelligence. She received several marriage proposals at the viceregal court, but she turned them all down. Rather than marry and devote her life to a husband and children, as was expected of most women in her day, Juana chose to enter a convent.
Sor Juana, as she was called as a nun, strongly supported women’s right to education. Many of her poems even criticised patriarchal social mores. When Sor Juana published an intelligent response refuting a famous biblical scholar, the leaders of the Church told Juana to give up all her scientific and educational pursuits, which they said were “unnatural” in women and told her to focus on her religious duties. Sor Juana finally agreed to go through penance, and she stopped writing and sold her library as well as all her scientific and musical instruments. She called herself la peor de todas las mujeres, “the worst of all women.” A few years later she died taking care of her sisters during a plague.
Fortunately many of Sor Juana’s writings have survived. You can read her poems here in Spanish, with English translations.

dragonsupremacy:

Portrait of Juana at age fifteen, painted in 1666.

Juana Inés de la Cruz (1651-1695) was the daughter of a Spanish Peninsular captain and a Creole woman. She was born in San Miguel Nepantla, Mexico on 2 December, 1651. For a woman of her time, Juana was well educated—and almost entirely self-taught, at that. She could read by age three, she mastered Latin, and she even learned Nahuatl, the Aztec language. She read many books and collected them for her library, and she wrote music and poems and became known throughout Mexico and Europe for her poetry. Juana asked for permission to dress as a man and enter the University of Mexico, but she was denied.

At age seventeen, the Viceroy Antonio Sebastián Álvarez de Toledo, the Marquis de Mancera, arranged for a jury of theologians, philosophers, and university professors to question Juana about a variety of scientific and literary subjects in order to test her knowledge. Juana answered their questions so brilliantly that she not only stumped these educated men, she also gained a reputation for her intelligence. She received several marriage proposals at the viceregal court, but she turned them all down. Rather than marry and devote her life to a husband and children, as was expected of most women in her day, Juana chose to enter a convent.

Sor Juana, as she was called as a nun, strongly supported women’s right to education. Many of her poems even criticised patriarchal social mores. When Sor Juana published an intelligent response refuting a famous biblical scholar, the leaders of the Church told Juana to give up all her scientific and educational pursuits, which they said were “unnatural” in women and told her to focus on her religious duties. Sor Juana finally agreed to go through penance, and she stopped writing and sold her library as well as all her scientific and musical instruments. She called herself la peor de todas las mujeres, “the worst of all women.” A few years later she died taking care of her sisters during a plague.

Fortunately many of Sor Juana’s writings have survived. You can read her poems here in Spanish, with English translations.

296 notes

I want to sleep for a while,
a while, a minute, a century;
as long as all know I am not dead;
that in my lips is a golden manger;
that I’m the slight friend of the West Wind;
that I’m the immense shadow of tears.
Federico García Lorca (via man-of-prose)

224 notes

Quiero llorar porque me da la gana
como lloran los niños del último banco,
porque yo no soy un hombre, ni un poeta, ni una hoja,
pero sí un pulso herido que sonda las cosas del otro lado.
Federico García Lorca, Poema doble del lago Edén (Fragmento)

(Source: lenguadelalma)

2,795 notes

Tenía frío y no pedía fuego, tenía terrible sed y no pedía agua: pedía libros, es decir, horizontes, es decir, escaleras para subir la cumbre del espíritu y del corazón. Porque la agonía física, biológica, natural, de un cuerpo por hambre, sed o frío, dura poco, muy poco, pero la agonía del alma insatisfecha dura toda la vida.
Federico García Lorca (via lenguadelalma)